WolffyLuna

50,451 notes

diseonfire:

dangerscissor:

kippy413:

dangerscissor:

i appreciate how immersive the gameplay is in x/y

That crow is so cute

yes she is thank you

aliquid-de-magis

Filed under pokemon birds videos

107,465 notes

opewinston:

toxsic:

pard-on-my-hard-on:

kingerock288:

lupercos:

(yelling) gay (normal voice) lesbian (muttering) bi….. sexual……. (confused whispering) tr…………… tran…….. trans…………..ss…………………………… (booming voice in the background) STRAIGHT  ALLIES

This sums up representation of LGBT pretty damn well

(sign language) pansexual (morse code beeps) asexual

(Ancient language of the elder gods) Nonbinary

(smoke signals) aromantic 

(via nightshade-victorian)

12,995 notes

apriorsectorinternalsecurity:

last-snowfall:

geardrops:

swanjolras:

out of all the aspects of millennial-bashing, i think the one that most confuses me is the “millennials all got trophies as a kid, so now they’re all self-centered narcissists” theory

like— kids are pretty smart, y’all. they can see that every kid on the team gets a trophy and is told they did a good job; they can also see that not every kid on the team deserves a trophy, and not everyone did do a good job

the logical conclusion to draw from this is not “i’m great and i deserve praise”— it’s “no matter how mediocre i am, people will still praise me to make me feel better, so i can’t trust any compliments or accolades i receive”

this is not a recipe for overconfidence and narcissism. it is a recipe for constant self-guessing, low self-esteem, and a distrust of one’s own abilities and skills.

where did this whole “ugh millennials think their so-so work is super great” thing even come from it is a goddamn mystery

what fucking kills me is, yeah, maybe we got the trophies, but who gave them out

this is not a recipe for overconfidence and narcissism. it is a recipe for constant self-guessing, low self-esteem, and a distrust of one’s own abilities and skills.

Which is pretty much what mental health practitioners observe happening.

It’s also what I observed happening as a singing teacher: the older kids literally would not believe a positive word I said until I had proved I would tell them they screwed up/had done badly/etc. I did so in as useful a way as possible (“So this passage. We really need to work on this passage. A lot. This passage is not good yet.”), but with almost every adolescent I taught I had to prove I would give them straight-up criticism before they would parse my praise as anything other than meaningless “the grownups always do this” noise.

That’s a thought that’s going to fester.

8,003 notes

The sun never sets on the British Empire because God doesn’t trust the British in the dark.

My extremely angry history teacher, quoting his extremely angry grandfather. 

(via greygreenwolf)

I quote this all the time. I feel like the Pitt Rivers museum should have it in metre-high letters on the wall. And I say it with a certain warmth. You’ve gotta have a little bit of horrified admiration for a nation state with such audaciously rapacious foreign policy. And then you gotta nail both their hands to the table where you can see ‘em and empty out their pockets.

(via cupiscent)

When British people criticize Americans for pretty much anything, we should just reply, “I learned it from YOU, DAD! I LEARNED IT FROM WATCHING YOU!”

(via baeddelshinsgirl)

(via sabbatine)

863 notes

Just when you thought a cat intensely chasing a laser pointer couldn’t get anymore engrossing, along comes an adorable toddler trying to help the cat get that pesky red dot. Prepare for the implosion of the entire Internet.

….

The human caretaker of the cat and child posted video of the encounter to YouTube. “His name is Phineas (2.5 years), the Cat is Muon (about 1 year),” the poster explained. “Phin had never seen the pointer before, and neither had Muon….My child and cat are on the same wavelength.”

(Source: jezebel.com, via goodstuffhappenedtoday)

Filed under cats kids videos

31,364 notes

ivoryathena:

Badass women of the future:

  1. Malavath Poorna, the youngest person ever to reach Mount Everest’s summit at the age of 13 years, 11 months
  2. Ann Makosinksi, Canadian inventor of a flashlight powered strictly by body heat at age 16

  3. Mo’Ne Davis, first girl to throw a Little League World Series shutout in history, with fastballs reaching speeds of up to 70mph, at age 13

  4. Alia Sabur, youngest university professor in the world, appointed to Konkuk University in South Korea at age 18

  5. Asia Newson, owning and operating a candle sales business alongside her father, is Detroit’s youngest entrepreneur at age 10

(via goodstuffhappenedtoday)

Filed under badass women