WolffyLuna

52,045 notes

kishiria:

ditavonbre:

pastel-gizibe:

canissapien80:

slackmistress:

bethanysworld:

fightingforanimals:

Veronika Scott was a fashion student at the College for Creative Studies in Detroit when her teacher, Stephen Schock, challenged her class to create a product that filled a need, rather than satisfying or creating a fad. Veronika’s design was a coat for homeless people that could transform into a sleeping bag, since in her city, she says, “you are constantly faced with the homeless epidemic.” Not only did her design win a International Design Excellence Award from the Industrial Designers Society of America, it’s become the core of Veronika’s nonprofit organization, The Empowerment Plan, which hires people from homeless shelters and transition homes to help her make the coats. Now, three years later, the 24-year-old social entrepreneur expects that her team of 15 seamstresses will produce over 6,000 coats in 2014 — all of which will be distributed free of charge to people living on the streets. Veronika originally designed the coats seeking input from people at a homeless shelter. After receiving feedback from people who used the prototype over a Detroit winter, she refined the design to create her final version which, in addition to being a waterproof and windproof coat and sleeping bag, also transforms into an over-the-shoulder bag with storage in the arm sockets. When she started out, Veronika states,

“Everybody told me that my business was going to fail — not because of who I was giving my product to but because of who I was hiring. They said that these homeless women will never make more than a peanut butter and jelly sandwich — you cannot rely on them for anything. And I know my ladies enjoy proving everybody wrong.” 

And, their impact is growing — according to CNN, which recently honored Veronika as one of their 10 Visionary Women of 2014, “The Empowerment Plan expects to launch a ‘buy one, give one’ program that will make it sustainable beyond the donations and sponsorships that keep it running now. Hunters and backpackers who’ve asked to buy the coat will be able to do so, and the Empowerment Plan will still create coats for homeless people who need them.”Veronika is also excited to show other clothing producers that local manufacturing is possible: “I think we’re going to show a lot of people: you think it’s outdated to do manufacturing in your neighborhood, but I think it’s something that we have to do in the future, where it’s sustainable, where you invest in people, where they’re not interchangeable parts.”You can read more about Veronika’s organization on CNN, or watch a short video about her work here.To learn more about The Empowerment Plan or how you can support their work, visit http://www.empowermentplan.org/For a wonderful book about women’s great inventions throughout history, check out “Girls Think of Everything” for readers 8 to 13.For those in the US who would like to support efforts to end homelessness and help the over 600,000 people who experience homelessness on any given night, visit the National Alliance to End Homelessness athttp://www.naeh.org/ or to find a local homeless shelter to support in your area, visit http://www.homelessshelterdirectory.org/

Important in so many ways.

This is amazing and wonderful.

Shit I’d buy one!

How amazing!

Lovelovelovelove


Gotta share!

kishiria:

ditavonbre:

pastel-gizibe:

canissapien80:

slackmistress:

bethanysworld:

fightingforanimals:

Veronika Scott was a fashion student at the College for Creative Studies in Detroit when her teacher, Stephen Schock, challenged her class to create a product that filled a need, rather than satisfying or creating a fad. Veronika’s design was a coat for homeless people that could transform into a sleeping bag, since in her city, she says, “you are constantly faced with the homeless epidemic.” 

Not only did her design win a International Design Excellence Award from the Industrial Designers Society of America, it’s become the core of Veronika’s nonprofit organization, The Empowerment Plan, which hires people from homeless shelters and transition homes to help her make the coats. Now, three years later, the 24-year-old social entrepreneur expects that her team of 15 seamstresses will produce over 6,000 coats in 2014 — all of which will be distributed free of charge to people living on the streets. 

Veronika originally designed the coats seeking input from people at a homeless shelter. After receiving feedback from people who used the prototype over a Detroit winter, she refined the design to create her final version which, in addition to being a waterproof and windproof coat and sleeping bag, also transforms into an over-the-shoulder bag with storage in the arm sockets. 

When she started out, Veronika states,

“Everybody told me that my business was going to fail — not because of who I was giving my product to but because of who I was hiring. They said that these homeless women will never make more than a peanut butter and jelly sandwich — you cannot rely on them for anything. And I know my ladies enjoy proving everybody wrong.” 

And, their impact is growing — according to CNN, which recently honored Veronika as one of their 10 Visionary Women of 2014, “The Empowerment Plan expects to launch a ‘buy one, give one’ program that will make it sustainable beyond the donations and sponsorships that keep it running now. Hunters and backpackers who’ve asked to buy the coat will be able to do so, and the Empowerment Plan will still create coats for homeless people who need them.”

Veronika is also excited to show other clothing producers that local manufacturing is possible: “I think we’re going to show a lot of people: you think it’s outdated to do manufacturing in your neighborhood, but I think it’s something that we have to do in the future, where it’s sustainable, where you invest in people, where they’re not interchangeable parts.”

You can read more about Veronika’s organization on CNN, or watch a short video about her work here.

To learn more about The Empowerment Plan or how you can support their work, visit http://www.empowermentplan.org/

For a wonderful book about women’s great inventions throughout history, check out “Girls Think of Everything” for readers 8 to 13.

For those in the US who would like to support efforts to end homelessness and help the over 600,000 people who experience homelessness on any given night, visit the National Alliance to End Homelessness athttp://www.naeh.org/ or to find a local homeless shelter to support in your area, visit http://www.homelessshelterdirectory.org/

Important in so many ways.

This is amazing and wonderful.

Shit I’d buy one!

How amazing!

Lovelovelovelove

Gotta share!

627 notes

sisterofsilence:

diseonfire:

monstertesk:

coelasquid:

It never occurred to me that draft mules were a thing but apparently they are and they just look like giant monster donkeys.

I want one.

My only question is… well… how.

kishiria, you’d want to get one of these if you still want a mule as a mount, draft crosses are the sweetest and gentlest creatures on this earth I am telling you *elbows wolffyluna while at it*

Aww, cool!

2,222 notes

cobra-23 asked: You say all cops are bastards but the first thing you will do if you get robbed is call the cops.

kishiria:

waroncops:

free-metis-army:

maxlibertarios:

waroncops:

i don’t call the cops.

there’s nothing they can do for me that i can’t do for myself.

waroncops.tumblr.com

Typical

There are alternatives to calling the cops.  For example you can file an notarized affidavit with any court that does the exact same thing as filing a police report.  Well it does everything except get the cops to investigate.  I might file a police report and an affidavit if a firearm or my truck was stolen.  These things usually have ways to prove they are mine built right into them.   But if someone stole my goddamn crescent wrench it’s almost impossible to prove which wrench is mine .  The cops wont put the effort into finding a $100 wrench that they would a registered firearm or automobile.  

No matter what is stolen the affidavit is probably more powerful in the event of a problem than the police report.  The police report doesn’t get filed into the public record until charges are laid with the court.  Police have been known to “forget” to do their job and it’s not a stretch to say the report never got transferred from the cop’s notebook to their recording system.  But when you file an affidavit it becomes public record.  For the courts or police to lose or improperly file an affidavit is a very serious problem as compared to losing or improperly handling a police report.  The police lose or refuse to file reports all the time.

The affidavit is more powerful for many reasons.  The most important is that the police rarely have the time to follow up on these things.  They need to fill their ticket and arrest quota.  Chasing down a wrench that can’t be effectively proven to be the one in question isn’t a priority.

Another benefit is that an affidavit keeps the injury private.  When you have a cop file a police report the injury is transferred to the government.  It’s now their injury and you willingly surrendered all of your rights to it.  For example did you ever notice that all charges laid in court have a monetary value attached to them?  The charges might be “petty theft of a wrench valued at $100” and the value of the charges could be set to $500. What’s that $500 about?  If the thief is convicted do you ever see the money?  Not if you called the cops. You surrendered that right when you brought the cops about it.  The crime went from a private injuryto a public one.  So not only will the thief be sentenced to way too much time in prison for theft but you don’t get your rightful compensation for the injury.  Now the judge gets your compensation added to his retirement fund or something.  Is it any wonder why Judges are so rich and that they get considerably richer as they move up the judicial ladder?

Another thing a police report does is subjects a petty thief to inhumane punishment.  Why should they go to prison over your stolen wrench when they could just pay you the $500 and return the wrench?  What benefit is there to society to subject another human being to those monsters in the “justice” system?  Don’t you really just want your wrench back and compensation for the time and money the theft caused you?  Is a wrench really worth all that inhumane treatment?  Geez man if I get my wrench back and compensation for having to go buy a new wrench in the mean time what more can I really ask for?  Is it worth risking the thief being brutalized in prison over?

The police, judges and lawyers all conspire to keep this from you.  Either they aren’t allowed to tell you or they hide it because they all aspire to move up in this scam.  So by safeguarding the scam for those higher on the ladder they are safeguarding their future as well.  If this information was more widely known the whole balance of power could shift.  These guys won’t give you the information that could render them obsolete.

thank you.

This post makes me happy.

125 notes

sabbatine:

starcunning:

timelord-consulting-hunter:

brutereason:

It’s so mind-boggling to me when people try to use evolutionary psychology not just to explain human behavior, but to make prescriptive claims about human behavior. Why the fuck am I obligated to behave in a manner that maximizes my chances of passing on my shitty genes to future generations? Who said I have to care whether or not my traits are perpetuated? What if I’m not interested in attracting males?

You are not obligated but it is basic biology instinct to want to reproduce in order to pass down your genetics and species. Biological survival of the fittest is that natural drive to keep your gene pool going.

Basic biology hits a snag where higher thinking is involved, though. Looking back over my lifetime, I can’t recall a single instance of wanting to have kids, and my family can’t remember my ever having said so. It’s always been “if I adopt” and I recently had a piece of metal inserted into my uterus that’s going to stay there til I’m nearly 40. It renders me incapable of getting pregnant. The matter of my passing on my genes is closed. Like Jareth and Sarah, the biological imperative has no power over me.

Also many, many cultures have celibate groups and also people who have literally starved themselves to death because they believed something. Our thoughts, socialization, and acculturation are powerful, far more powerful than all but the most basic of drives- drink, eat, sleep, survival. We can conquer drinking and eating to the point of death, sleep to the point of insanity, and survival is overcome by the thousands every day. We are not slaves to biological drives